Training Courses

 

STUDENT PILOT CERTIFICATE

  If you're wondering what it takes to train as a microlight pilot, here's an outline of what you need to know. 

  A Student Pilot membership of the Hang Gliding Federation of Australia (HGFA) allows up to three hours of training before joining as a full member (full membership costs can be obtained from the HGFA via their website www.hfga.asn.au). Once the three hours are done, full membership of the HGFA is a pre-requisite for further training.

  After your Trial Instructional Flight, further flight-training is done with the student flying from the front-seat. By the time you have done the first three hours you are well on the way to learning the fundamentals of microlight flying and can then decide if you wish to continue training for your Weightshift Microlight Pilot Certificate.

Training Cost per hour:

$198.00

  When you become a full member of the HGFA you are issued with your membership card, pilot logbook and student pilot theory workbook. There are any number of textbooks for student pilots, but we highly recommend "Basic Aeronautical Knowledge" by Bob Tait (12th edition or later, with the "Human Factors" section), The Visual Flight Rules Guide (currently only available as a downloadable pdf via the AirServices Australia website) and "The Microlight Pilots Handbook" by Brian Cosgrove. A simple textbook on meteorology is also useful. The HGFA issue all pilot qualification certificates, members' insurance, etc. Ask your instructor for the fees involved at the appropriate time as they are subject to review by the HGFA.

 

PILOT CERTIFICATE

  Comprehensive lessons, based on a structured training syllabus, are designed to assist you to attain the relevant skills and knowledge required for the issue of a Weightshift Microlight Pilot Certificate. Practical flying lessons are paid for by-the-hour. Theory lessons are taught to maintain sync with practical flying skills. To maximise learning and minimise fatigue, flying-lessons are usually split into two half-hour sessions with a short break between them once the student becomes involved with the intricacies of circuit-flying.

Training Cost per hour:

$198.00

  Note: The issue of a Pilot Certificate requires a minimum of 20 hours total flying time, as well as passes in the two mandatory theory exams plus demonstration of practical flying skills to the required standard. Solo-flying depends entirely on satisfactory progress in both theory and practical flight-training. A total of 5 hours of solo consolidation flying, under direct supervision of the Chief Flying Instructor, are also required before a Weightshift Microlight Pilot Certificate can be issued. Also keep in mind the need to purchase your own microlight aircraft for further solo flying after you have done your first solo. Most serious student-pilots actually buy their trike well before they solo and complete their training in it. There is no organisation that hires trikes to pilots; you have to own your own aircraft to continue flying.

  Cost of exams is $55.00 per exam (includes GST).

ADDITIONAL PILOT ENDORSEMENTS

  Pilot Certificate holders can go on to achieve extra qualifications, e.g. Cross-Country Endorsement, Passenger-Carrying Endorsement, Tug-Master Endorsement (for aero-towing hang-gliders), Radio-Operator's Endorsement and various Instructor Ratings. (See the "Prices" web-page for latest pricing for these endorsements.) In most circumstances, these higher ratings are done using the pilot's own aircraft.

  When you become a full member of the HGFA you are issued with your membership card, pilot logbook and student pilot theory workbook. There are any number of textbooks for student pilots, but we highly recommend "Basic Aeronautical Knowledge" by Bob Tait (12th edition or later, with the "Human Factors" section), The Visual Flight Rules Guide (currently only available as a downloadable pdf via the AirServices Australia website) and "The Microlight Pilots Handbook" by Brian Cosgrove. A simple textbook on meteorology is also useful. The HGFA issue all pilot qualification certificates, members' insurance, etc. Ask your instructor for the fees involved at the appropriate time as they are subject to review by the HGFA.

  Every two years pilots are required to perform a Biennial Flight Review (BFR) with a Chief Flying Instructor. Think of this as a "quality-control" check for the pilot. It gives the pilot a chance to revise non-standard manoeuvres, to practice simulated engine-failures on takeoff and in the circuit etc as well as practice forced-landings away from the airport, simulated emergencies involving passengers etc. Sydney Microlight Centre Pty Ltd is able to do BFRs for both HGFA and RA-Aus microlight pilots.

 


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